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Testimony to Maryland Juvenile Justice Reform Council on Trends Charging Children As Adults

July 20, 2021
The Sentencing Project strongly encourages the Juvenile Justice Reform Council to adopt recommendations [based on research and public safety] that will ensure all children start in juvenile court, and that cases are reviewed on an individual basis by a judge before determining they should be sent to adult court

Maryland is second only to Alabama in the rate at which it sends children to adult court for criminal prosecution. On July 20, 2021, The Sentencing Project’s Marcy Mistrett testified before the Maryland Juvenile Justice Reform Council (JJRC) on national trends in charging children as adults and why it’s imperative children are treated as children. The Sentencing Project strongly encourages the JJRC to adopt recommendations [based on research and public safety] that will ensure all children start in juvenile court, and that cases are reviewed on an individual basis by a judge before determining they should be sent to adult court.

 
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Testimony Before DC Council's Committee on the Judiciary in Support of the Redefinition of Child Amendment Act of 2021

Josh Rovner
The Sentencing Project's Senior Advocacy Associate Josh Rovner submitted testimony endorsing Bill 24-338, the Redefinition of Child Amendment Act of 2021, before the Council of the District of Columbia, Committee on the Judiciary. The hearing considers whether all of DC’s children should be seen as such. The bill would apply to 16-and 17-year-olds who have been charged with any one of a set of serious offenses.