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publications
April 24, 2018

Families and Mass Incarceration

In the United States mothers and fathers go to prison at troubling rates. One of every 12 American children, more than 5.7 million kids under age 18, have experienced parental incarceration at some point during their lives.
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Race & Justice News: Louisiana’s Non-Unanimous Juries Disadvantage African Americans
April 23, 2018

Race & Justice News: Louisiana’s Non-Unanimous Juries Disadvantage African Americans

On average, Louisiana sends one person to prison every five days on the decision of a divided jury—a practice that disproportionately impacts African Americans. Learn more in Race & Justice News.
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Kemba Smith

At 24 years old, Kemba Smith was sentenced to 24.5 years in prison for conspiracy to participate in her boyfriend's drug activities, a non-violent, first-time offense. For years, her parents galvanized a tireless movement seeking clemency for their daughter.
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Trump’s commitment to a renewed War on Drugs
April 20, 2018

Trump’s commitment to a renewed War on Drugs

Officials should not see this public health crisis as an invitation to exacerbate mass incarceration.
publications
April 19, 2018

Report to the United Nations on Racial Disparities in the U.S. Criminal Justice System

The Sentencing Project submitted a report to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance
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Christopher Poulos

When Chris Poulos was arrested, he experienced firsthand the difference that money can make in the criminal justice system. He recounts the experience in his own words.
publications
April 10, 2018

Letter to Subcommittee Hearing on Defeating Fentanyl: Addressing the Deadliest Drugs Fueling the Opioid Crisis

The Sentencing Project outlines lessons learned from the War on Drugs and recommends that federal resources be directed towards policies that will expand access to drug treatment to stop the skyrocketing death toll from overdoses caused by fentanyl and other opioids.
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Disenfranchisement News: Woman sentenced to 5 years for voting with a felony conviction
April 05, 2018

Disenfranchisement News: Woman sentenced to 5 years for voting with a felony conviction

A woman on supervised release voted in the November election and was sentenced to 5 years in prison, Florida officials appeal court order to reform system for restoring voting rights, and more in Disenfranchisement News.
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Willie Mays Aikens

In 2008, Willie Mays Aikens made headlines when a federal judge reduced his lengthy prison term to 14 years as a result of the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s adjustment to the crack cocaine sentencing guidelines. Aikens was released in June 2008.
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Race & Justice News: Jackson, MS to Stop Releasing Mug Shots of People Shot by Police
March 30, 2018

Race & Justice News: Jackson, MS to Stop Releasing Mug Shots of People Shot by Police

"The last image of any person should not be on the worst day of their life," said Jackson Mayor. Learn more in Race & Justice News.
publications
March 29, 2018

The Sentencing Project Releases its 2017 Annual Report

Learn more about how our research and analysis in 2017 played a major role in shaping the policy debate around criminal justice reform.
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Marlo Hargrove and David Waller

Marlo Hargrove and David Waller both successfully regained their voting rights after receiving felony convictions and serving their sentences.
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Punitive responses to gang violence are not effective
March 28, 2018

Punitive responses to gang violence are not effective

Residents of the communities that experience gang crime want it to stop, and there are better ways to make that happen than sending more people to prison for ever longer sentences.
publications
National coalition rejects death penalty and increased penalties for drug offenses
March 27, 2018

National coalition rejects death penalty and increased penalties for drug offenses

Sixty-two faith, civil rights, treatment and legal organizations condemn accelerating the use of the death penalty and urge the Trump Administration to support proven public health strategies to end the opioid crisis, reduce problematic drug use and save lives.
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Featured Story

Andres Idarraga

After his release in June of 2004, Andres Idarraga became a full-time student at Brown University studying comparative literature and economics while maintaining full-time employment. Idarraga saw his right to vote as a significant and crucial aspect to rebuilding his life and to contributing to his community.
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