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publications
October 07, 2021

Sign-on Letter: Pass the Redefinition of Child Amendment Act of 2021

Justice organizations urge the Mayor and the Council of the District of Columbia to pass Bill 4-0338, the Redefinition of Child Amendment Act of 2021 as a necessary, common sense approach to juvenile justice reform that will create better outcomes for youth and communities, will treat children as children, and will make significant steps forward in advancing racial equity.
publications
September 22, 2021

Sign-on Letter: Stop Sequel Pomegranate’s Abuse of Ohio's Youth and Families

Pomegranate survivors and youth justice organizations request a meeting with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services to discuss ways to prevent placement of youth in for-profit youth residential treatment facilities, and to ensure that youth receive care in safe environments free from abuse and neglect.
Featured Story
Featured Story

Andres Idarraga

After his release in June of 2004, Andres Idarraga became a full-time student at Brown University studying comparative literature and economics while maintaining full-time employment. Idarraga saw his right to vote as a significant and crucial aspect to rebuilding his life and to contributing to his community.
publications
September 22, 2021

In the Extreme: Women Serving Life Without Parole and Death Sentences in the United States

One of every 15 women in prison — amounting to more than 6,600 women — is serving a life sentence and nearly 2,000 of these have no chance for parole. Another 52 women in the U.S. are awaiting execution. Many women serving extreme sentences were victims of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse long before they committed a crime.
publications
September 13, 2021

Letter Supporting Immediate Consideration and Passage of Sentencing Reform Legislation

At least three bipartisan sentencing reform proposals, the First Step Implementation Act (S.1014), the COVID-19 Safer Detention Act (S.312), and the Prohibiting Punishment of Acquitted Conduct Act (S.601) await a floor vote after the Judiciary Committee approved them this past spring.
Featured Story
Featured Story

Willie Mays Aikens

In 2008, Willie Mays Aikens made headlines when a federal judge reduced his lengthy prison term to 14 years as a result of the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s adjustment to the crack cocaine sentencing guidelines. Aikens was released in June 2008.
news
September 07, 2021

Meeting the Back-to-School Challenge: Get Involved!

Richard Mendel
By investing in proven solutions and partnering with the community, the education system can avert potential tragedy in 2021-22 and establish a new normal in our education system that fosters success, promotes equity, and recognizes the realities of adolescent behavior and brain development.
news
September 01, 2021

September is National Voting Rights Month: Join our Movement to #FreetheVote!

Keeda Haynes
In honor of National Voting Rights Month, The Sentencing Project is hosting a webinar, virtual move screenings, and a fundraiser to help us dramatically expand our voting rights research and advocacy.
Featured Story
Featured Story

Christopher Poulos

When Chris Poulos was arrested, he experienced firsthand the difference that money can make in the criminal justice system. He recounts the experience in his own words.
publications
August 31, 2021

Back-to-School Action Guide: Re-Engaging Students and Closing the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Thanks to a $122 billion infusion of federal funds, schools and communities can invest vast resources in effective new approaches that offer us the power to keep children in school and help them progress along the path to educational success.
publications
August 20, 2021

Conversation About Crime Survivors and Justice Reforms

The Sentencing Project and national victim/survivor advocate Anne Seymour, with support from Open Philanthropy, sponsored a virtual conversation to identify strategies that can more wholly identify and address the needs of survivors, those who harm them, and the communities in which they reside.
Featured Story
Featured Story

Denver Schimming

As a previously incarcerated person who had his voting rights restored in 1996, Denver Schimming knew the power and importance of voting. His years in prison taught him that the criminal justice system could change only if impacted people spoke out. After his incarceration, voting was one of his highest priorities.
publications
July 28, 2021

Voting Rights in the Era of Mass Incarceration: A Primer

Jean Chung
As of 2020, 5.2 million Americans were prohibited from voting due to laws that disenfranchise citizens convicted of felony offenses. Felony disenfranchisement rates vary by state, as states institute a wide range of disenfranchisement policies.
news
July 27, 2021

Race & Justice News: Eliminating Crack / Cocaine Sentencing Disparity

House Vote on Eliminating Sentencing Disparity Between Crack and Powder Cocaine, a study commissioned by Denver District Attorney finds disparate prosecutorial outcomes, and more in Race & Justice News.
Featured Story
Featured Story

Dorothy Gaines

Dorothy Gaines's life changed when Alabama state police raided her home for drugs. Police found no evidence of Gaines having possessed or sold drugs, yet federal prosecutors charged Gaines with drug conspiracy.
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