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State Advocacy News: Rallying for Criminal Justice Reform
February 05, 2020

State Advocacy News: Rallying for Criminal Justice Reform

This year, advocates in several states have held rallies or protests designed to influence decision makers in support of justice reform goals.
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Race & Justice News: St. Louis Prosecutor Fights “Racially Motivated Conspiracy”
February 03, 2020

Race & Justice News: St. Louis Prosecutor Fights “Racially Motivated Conspiracy”

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner alleges some city leaders have tried to undermine her efforts to fight police misconduct and reform the local criminal justice system. Gardner, St. Louis’s first African American top prosecutor, is suing the city under an 1871 federal civil rights law known as the Ku Klux Klan Act.
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Kemba Smith

At 24 years old, Kemba Smith was sentenced to 24.5 years in prison for conspiracy to participate in her boyfriend's drug activities, a non-violent, first-time offense. For years, her parents galvanized a tireless movement seeking clemency for their daughter.
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The Appeal: The Death Penalty Is Part Of A Larger System of Punishment
January 31, 2020

The Appeal: The Death Penalty Is Part Of A Larger System of Punishment

As the number of people on death row decreases, the number of people serving life sentences has risen. Abolishing the death penalty should not serve as a way to replace one extreme sentence with another—but as a first step to reform extreme sentences altogether, says The Sentencing Project's Ashley Nellis.
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Disenfranchisement News: FL Supreme Court rules all costs must be paid to regain voting rights
January 28, 2020

Disenfranchisement News: FL Supreme Court rules all costs must be paid to regain voting rights

Florida rules all costs must be paid to restore voting rights, Georgia Senate study committee votes to not expand voting rights, and more in our latest Disenfranchisement News.
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Willie Mays Aikens

In 2008, Willie Mays Aikens made headlines when a federal judge reduced his lengthy prison term to 14 years as a result of the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s adjustment to the crack cocaine sentencing guidelines. Aikens was released in June 2008.
publications
January 28, 2020

Letter to House Judiciary Committee on Classwide Scheduling of Fentanyl Analogues

The Sentencing Project wrote to the House Judiciary Committee in opposition of S. 3201, the Temporary Reauthorization and Study of the Emergency Scheduling of Fentanyl Analogues Act and urged committee members to exclude the application of mandatory minimum sentences for cases prosecuted under this authority.
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Washington Post: William Barr’s new war on drugs
January 26, 2020

Washington Post: William Barr’s new war on drugs

Former U.S. District Judge Nancy Gertner discusses Attorney General William P. Barr’s support for an expansion of mandatory minimum sentences for federal drug crimes involving fentanyl analogues.
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Lawrence and Lamont Garrison

Sentences for federal drug crimes are based on the quantity of the drugs involved, not the individual’s role in the crime. The emphasis on quantity rather than the role of the offender, along with the conspiracy laws, too often result in disproportionate sentencing, even for first-time offenses such as the Garrisons’.
publications
January 21, 2020

Comments to the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice on Asylum Eligibility

Nazgol Ghandnoosh
Comments of Nazgol Ghandnoosh, Senior Research Analyst at The Sentencing Project, submitted to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Department of Justice about asylum restrictions based on criminal histories.
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State Advocacy News: Strategizing to End Life Imprisonment
December 23, 2019

State Advocacy News: Strategizing to End Life Imprisonment

As the movement to challenge mass incarceration evolves there is growing attention being given to the dramatic impact of life sentences on the prison population. In 2019 national and state groups worked to build the base of support for ending life imprisonment. State advocates and organizers facilitated connections through strategy sessions to support reform.
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Christopher Poulos

When Chris Poulos was arrested, he experienced firsthand the difference that money can make in the criminal justice system. He recounts the experience in his own words.
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A death by any other name
December 19, 2019

A death by any other name

Ashley Nellis
Declining support for the death penalty is a victory, but its presence or absence shouldn't be our sole barometer for a proportionate sentencing regime. Life without parole as the "humane alternative" to death is highly problematic.
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Race & Justice News: Department of Justice Frames Reforms as Anti-Police
December 18, 2019

Race & Justice News: Department of Justice Frames Reforms as Anti-Police

The Department of Justice has framed policing and prosecutorial reforms as anti-police. In recent months, other DOJ officials have joined Attorney General William Barr in similarly framing local prosecutorial reforms.
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July 26, 2017

Dr. Stanley Andrisse

From prison cells to PhD, Dr. Stanley Andrisse shares his transformation to inspire those impacted by the criminal justice system.
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