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publications
May 10, 2018

Incarcerated Women and Girls

Over the past quarter century, there has been a profound change in the involvement of women within the criminal justice system. This is the result of more expansive law enforcement efforts, stiffer drug sentencing laws, and post-conviction barriers to reentry that uniquely affect women.
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State Advocacy News: Grassroots Actions to Challenge Mass Incarceration
May 01, 2018

State Advocacy News: Grassroots Actions to Challenge Mass Incarceration

Coalitions in Maryland, Mississippi, and Kentucky mobilized to counter regressive sentencing measures by promoting solutions addressing underlying causes of crime.
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Dorothy Gaines

Dorothy Gaines's life changed when Alabama state police raided her home for drugs. Police found no evidence of Gaines having possessed or sold drugs, yet federal prosecutors charged Gaines with drug conspiracy.
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Jeff Sessions is shamefully undermining WEB Du Bois's legacy
April 30, 2018

Jeff Sessions is shamefully undermining WEB Du Bois's legacy

Marc Mauer
A justice department program of research fellowships in the civil rights leader’s name has been twisted to suit the attorney general’s agenda
publications
April 24, 2018

Families and Mass Incarceration

In the United States mothers and fathers go to prison at troubling rates. One of every 12 American children, more than 5.7 million kids under age 18, have experienced parental incarceration at some point during their lives.
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Christopher Poulos

When Chris Poulos was arrested, he experienced firsthand the difference that money can make in the criminal justice system. He recounts the experience in his own words.
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Race & Justice News: Louisiana’s Non-Unanimous Juries Disadvantage African Americans
April 23, 2018

Race & Justice News: Louisiana’s Non-Unanimous Juries Disadvantage African Americans

On average, Louisiana sends one person to prison every five days on the decision of a divided jury—a practice that disproportionately impacts African Americans. Learn more in Race & Justice News.
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Trump’s commitment to a renewed War on Drugs
April 20, 2018

Trump’s commitment to a renewed War on Drugs

Officials should not see this public health crisis as an invitation to exacerbate mass incarceration.
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Kemba Smith

At 24 years old, Kemba Smith was sentenced to 24.5 years in prison for conspiracy to participate in her boyfriend's drug activities, a non-violent, first-time offense. For years, her parents galvanized a tireless movement seeking clemency for their daughter.
publications
April 19, 2018

Report to the United Nations on Racial Disparities in the U.S. Criminal Justice System

The Sentencing Project submitted a report to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance
publications
April 10, 2018

Letter to Subcommittee Hearing on Defeating Fentanyl: Addressing the Deadliest Drugs Fueling the Opioid Crisis

The Sentencing Project outlines lessons learned from the War on Drugs and recommends that federal resources be directed towards policies that will expand access to drug treatment to stop the skyrocketing death toll from overdoses caused by fentanyl and other opioids.
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Willie Mays Aikens

In 2008, Willie Mays Aikens made headlines when a federal judge reduced his lengthy prison term to 14 years as a result of the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s adjustment to the crack cocaine sentencing guidelines. Aikens was released in June 2008.
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Disenfranchisement News: Woman sentenced to 5 years for voting with a felony conviction
April 05, 2018

Disenfranchisement News: Woman sentenced to 5 years for voting with a felony conviction

A woman on supervised release voted in the November election and was sentenced to 5 years in prison, Florida officials appeal court order to reform system for restoring voting rights, and more in Disenfranchisement News.
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Race & Justice News: Jackson, MS to Stop Releasing Mug Shots of People Shot by Police
March 30, 2018

Race & Justice News: Jackson, MS to Stop Releasing Mug Shots of People Shot by Police

"The last image of any person should not be on the worst day of their life," said Jackson Mayor. Learn more in Race & Justice News.
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Theresa McIntyre Smith

In 1999, Theresa Smith was arrested at an airport after she met a drug courier in Roy Mercer’s network and according to the government, identified a suitcase containing eleven kilograms of cocaine for the courier. Smith said she had been told by Mercer that the suitcase contained his nieces’ clothes. For this first-time non-violent offense, Smith was sentenced to a ten-year mandatory prison term.
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