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publications
April 13, 2021

Juvenile Life Without Parole: An Overview

Josh Rovner
The United States stands alone as the only nation that sentences people to life without parole for crimes committed before turning 18. This briefing paper reviews the Supreme Court precedents that limited the use of JLWOP and the challenges that remain.
news
March 31, 2021

Race & Justice News: Maryland Will Test Racial Impact Statements

Whites became more punitive near large Black populations in post-Jim Crow era, Maryland will test racial impact statements to assess legislation, Virginia police task force discontinues use of gang database, and more in Race & Justice News.
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Christopher Poulos

When Chris Poulos was arrested, he experienced firsthand the difference that money can make in the criminal justice system. He recounts the experience in his own words.
news
March 25, 2021

Voting Rights News: Oregon Considers Universal Suffrage

The Sentencing Project worked closely with state coalitions in Connecticut, Georgia, Minnesota and Texas to expand voting rights to citizens with felony convictions. We developed a series of briefing papers highlighting each state’s voter exclusion policies and the laws’ impact on citizens with criminal legal involvement.
publications
March 22, 2021

Testimony to Oregon's House Rules Committee in Support of Universal Suffrage Act

The Sentencing Project offered expert testimony before Oregon’s House Rules Committee In support of House Bill 2366, a Universal Suffrage Act. HB 2366 repeals the prohibition on voting by individuals convicted of a felony and serving a court–ordered sentence of imprisonment for their conviction.
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Featured Story
December 01, 2017

James Inge

James D. Inge is one of 300 individuals age 60 or older arrested between 1965 and 1980 that was sentenced to life imprisonment in Pennsylvania. Learn more about his campaign to give rehabilitated seniors serving life a second chance.
publications
March 03, 2021

Private Prisons in the United States

Thirty-one states and the federal government incarcerated 116,000 people in private prisons in 2019, representing 8% of the total state and federal prison population.      
publications
February 24, 2021

Racial Impact Statements

Racial impact statements are a tool for lawmakers to evaluate potential disparities of proposed legislation prior to adoption and implementation. Analogous to fiscal impact statements, they assist legislators in detecting unforeseen policy ramifications.
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Featured Story

Dorothy Gaines

Dorothy Gaines's life changed when Alabama state police raided her home for drugs. Police found no evidence of Gaines having possessed or sold drugs, yet federal prosecutors charged Gaines with drug conspiracy.
publications
February 21, 2021

Testimony in Support of Virginia Racial Impact Statement Bill

The Sentencing Project offered expert testimony in support of Virginia’s House Bill 1990, a Racial Impact Statement Act. In recent years, legislators in several states have introduced legislation to adopt racial impact statements policies.
publications
February 17, 2021

No End In Sight: America's Enduring Reliance on Life Imprisonment

Ashley Nellis
In the United States, more than 200,000 people are serving life sentences – one out of every seven in prison.
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Lawrence and Lamont Garrison

Sentences for federal drug crimes are based on the quantity of the drugs involved, not the individual’s role in the crime. The emphasis on quantity rather than the role of the offender, along with the conspiracy laws, too often result in disproportionate sentencing, even for first-time offenses such as the Garrisons’.
publications
February 03, 2021

Racial Disparities in Youth Incarceration Persist

Josh Rovner
In an era of declining youth incarceration, Black and American Indian youth are still overwhelmingly more likely to be held in custody than their white peers.
publications
February 03, 2021

Testimony Before Maine's Joint Standing Committee on State and Local Government in Support of Racial Impact Statements

The Sentencing Project's Director of Advocacy Nicole D. Porter submitted expert testimony in support of Maine's LD 2, An Act to Require the Inclusion of Racial Impact Statements in the Legislative Process. Racial impact statements offer one means by which state officials can begin to engage in a proactive assessment of how to address these challenging issues in a constructive and proactive way.
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Featured Story

Willie Mays Aikens

In 2008, Willie Mays Aikens made headlines when a federal judge reduced his lengthy prison term to 14 years as a result of the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s adjustment to the crack cocaine sentencing guidelines. Aikens was released in June 2008.
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