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The Sentencing Project Calls on Congress to Pass First Step Act
November 28, 2018

The Sentencing Project Calls on Congress to Pass First Step Act

In a letter sent to Senate and House leadership, The Sentencing Project urged Congress to move quickly to pass the sentencing reform measures in the First Step Act (S.3649) "to help create a safer, more equitable and fairer justice system."
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Policy Proposal: Instate 15-Year Maximum Wait For Parole Eligibility
November 20, 2018

Policy Proposal: Instate 15-Year Maximum Wait For Parole Eligibility

Expedited parole consideration for people serving parole-eligible life sentences and the reinstatement of parole for all sentences would serve as a realistic challenge to mass incarceration and provide a better approach to advancing public safety.
Featured Story
Featured Story

Lawrence and Lamont Garrison

Sentences for federal drug crimes are based on the quantity of the drugs involved, not the individual’s role in the crime. The emphasis on quantity rather than the role of the offender, along with the conspiracy laws, too often result in disproportionate sentencing, even for first-time offenses such as the Garrisons’.
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The Sentencing Project Launches Campaign to End Life Imprisonment
November 09, 2018

The Sentencing Project Launches Campaign to End Life Imprisonment

Join The Sentencing Project & Public Welfare Foundation on December 4th for our campaign launch and release of The Meaning of Life: The Case for Abolishing Life Sentences.
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State Criminal Justice Reform and the 2018 Midterms
November 07, 2018

State Criminal Justice Reform and the 2018 Midterms

Voters across the nation considered a number of criminal justice reform measures—ranging from voting rights to sentencing reform.
Featured Story
Featured Story

Kemba Smith

At 24 years old, Kemba Smith was sentenced to 24.5 years in prison for conspiracy to participate in her boyfriend's drug activities, a non-violent, first-time offense. For years, her parents galvanized a tireless movement seeking clemency for their daughter.
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State Advocacy News: Retroactivity and Criminal Justice Reform
November 05, 2018

State Advocacy News: Retroactivity and Criminal Justice Reform

Voters decide on ballot proposals for retroactive sentencing and the restoration of voting rights to people with felony convictions.
publications
November 05, 2018

Long-Term Sentences: Time to Reconsider the Scale of Punishment

Unduly long prison terms are counterproductive for public safety and contribute to the dynamic of diminishing returns as the prison system has expanded.
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Featured Story

Denver Schimming

As a previously incarcerated person who had his voting rights restored in 1996, Denver Schimming knew the power and importance of voting. His years in prison taught him that the criminal justice system could change only if impacted people spoke out. After his incarceration, voting was one of his highest priorities.
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Race & Justice News: Blacks Disproportionately Arrested for Marijuana in Alabama
October 30, 2018

Race & Justice News: Blacks Disproportionately Arrested for Marijuana in Alabama

Blacks in Alabama were four times as likely to be arrested for marijuana possession in 2016 as whites, L.A. County deputies disproportionately stop Latinos to find drugs, and more in Race & Justice News.
publications
October 22, 2018

Juvenile Life Without Parole: An Overview

Josh Rovner
The United States stands alone as the only nation that sentences people to life without parole for crimes committed before turning 18. This briefing paper reviews the Supreme Court precedents that limited the use of JLWOP and the challenges that remain.
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Featured Story

Christopher Poulos

When Chris Poulos was arrested, he experienced firsthand the difference that money can make in the criminal justice system. He recounts the experience in his own words.
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Marc Mauer Named  “Frederick Douglass 200” Awardee
October 20, 2018

Marc Mauer Named “Frederick Douglass 200” Awardee

The Sentencing Project's Executive Director Marc Mauer has been named a "Frederick Douglass 200" Awardee for his continued scholarship and advocacy that has impacted "anti-incarceration activism around the country."
publications
October 17, 2018

Expanding the Vote: Two Decades of Felony Disenfranchisement Reforms

Since 1997, 23 states have amended felony disenfranchisement policies in an effort to reduce their restrictiveness and expand voter eligibility.
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Featured Story

Andres Idarraga

After his release in June of 2004, Andres Idarraga became a full-time student at Brown University studying comparative literature and economics while maintaining full-time employment. Idarraga saw his right to vote as a significant and crucial aspect to rebuilding his life and to contributing to his community.
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