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Law and order agenda should take note of bipartisanship’s results
November 29, 2016

Law and order agenda should take note of bipartisanship’s results

Kara Gotsch
Trump ran his campaign on “law and order,” but the incoming president and attorney general would be wise to build on successful, bipartisan criminal justice reform initiatives in the months and years ahead.
publications
November 29, 2016

Citing Uncertainty of Next Administration’s Commitment to Criminal Justice Reform, Broad Coalition Calls On Obama to Expand Clemency Eligibility

A broad coalition of criminal justice reform advocates, former judges and prosecutors, and legal scholars urge President Obama to expand the number of people eligible for clemency by considering commutations for broad categories of non-violent offenses.
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Andres Idarraga

After his release in June of 2004, Andres Idarraga became a full-time student at Brown University studying comparative literature and economics while maintaining full-time employment. Idarraga saw his right to vote as a significant and crucial aspect to rebuilding his life and to contributing to his community.
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Disenfranchisement News: How Florida's felony disenfranchisement laws impact elections
November 08, 2016

Disenfranchisement News: How Florida's felony disenfranchisement laws impact elections

Analysis finds Floridians with felony convictions would cast nearly 60K ballots in this election, D.C.mayor visits local jail to help eligible individuals vote, and more in our latest Disenfranchisement News.
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Race & Justice News:
October 28, 2016

Race & Justice News: "The Jude Effect": Police Brutality Reduces 911 Calls

Study finds that blacks reduce their crime-reporting behavior in the wake of high-profile cases of police brutality, black women with criminal records more likely to face housing discrimination in D.C., and more in our latest Race and Justice News.
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Denver Schimming

As a previously incarcerated person who had his voting rights restored in 1996, Denver Schimming knew the power and importance of voting. His years in prison taught him that the criminal justice system could change only if impacted people spoke out. After his incarceration, voting was one of his highest priorities.
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Unable to Vote, New Yorkers Reach Out, Try to Have Impact on U.S. Election
October 12, 2016

Unable to Vote, New Yorkers Reach Out, Try to Have Impact on U.S. Election

A group of formerly incarcerated New Yorkers recently traveled to Ohio with one goal: to inform Ohio residents with felony convictions of their voting rights.
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C-SPAN highlights The Sentencing Project’s 6 Million Lost Voters Report
October 06, 2016

C-SPAN highlights The Sentencing Project’s 6 Million Lost Voters Report

Marc Mauer discusses The Sentencing Project's felony disenfranchisement report, and answers questions from people for and against restoring rights to people with felony convictions.
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Featured Story

Kimberly Haven

Kimberly Haven’s journey as an advocate began when she sought to regain her own voting rights after release from a Maryland prison in 2001. She soon became passionate about the unfairness of disenfranchising citizens after they have completed their sentence and returned to the community.
publications
October 06, 2016

6 Million Lost Voters: State-Level Estimates of Felony Disenfranchisement, 2016

Christopher Uggen, Ryan Larson, and Sarah Shannon
A record 6.1 million Americans are forbidden to vote because of felony disenfranchisement, or laws restricting voting rights for those convicted of felony-level crimes. The number of disenfranchised individuals has increased dramatically along with the rise in criminal justice populations in recent decades, rising from an estimated 1.17 million in 1976 to 6.1 million today.
publications
October 05, 2016

Unlocking Justice: Strategizing for Reform - State Campaign Successes

This webinar highlighted successful efforts to scale back collateral consequences and challenge racial disparity in state sentencing policy.
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Lawrence and Lamont Garrison

Sentences for federal drug crimes are based on the quantity of the drugs involved, not the individual’s role in the crime. The emphasis on quantity rather than the role of the offender, along with the conspiracy laws, too often result in disproportionate sentencing, even for first-time offenses such as the Garrisons’.
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Disenfranchisement News: CA grants voting rights to people serving felony sentences in jail
October 04, 2016

Disenfranchisement News: CA grants voting rights to people serving felony sentences in jail

California governor restores voting rights to 50,000 people serving felony sentences in county jails, federal lawsuit seeks to overturn voting ban for people in Alabama with felony convictions, and more in our latest Disenfranchisement News.
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Lawsuit Accuses Alabama of Bias in Law That Bars Some Felons From Voting
September 26, 2016

Lawsuit Accuses Alabama of Bias in Law That Bars Some Felons From Voting

A federal lawsuit filed on Monday claims that Alabama's law revoking the voting rights of any person “convicted of a felony involving moral turpitude” is racially discriminatory and unconstitutional.
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Dorothy Gaines

Dorothy Gaines's life changed when Alabama state police raided her home for drugs. Police found no evidence of Gaines having possessed or sold drugs, yet federal prosecutors charged Gaines with drug conspiracy.
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