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publications
June 28, 2017

Incarceration Rates in an International Perspective

A nation’s rate of incarceration is the number of people incarcerated as a proportion of its total population. Internationally, there is broad variation in the degree to which nations incarcerate their citizens, with a nearly 40-fold difference between the highest and lowest rates. The incarceration rate is often interpreted as a measurement of the degree of punitiveness in a society, although it is an imperfect measurement.
news
Race & Justice News: Police Officers Speak More Respectfully to White Drivers
June 26, 2017

Race & Justice News: Police Officers Speak More Respectfully to White Drivers

Police body camera footage shows Oakland police officers speak more respectfully to white drivers than black drivers, Native Americans are three times more likely to be killed by law enforcement than their white counterparts, and more in Race and Justice News.
Featured Story
Featured Story

Andres Idarraga

After his release in June of 2004, Andres Idarraga became a full-time student at Brown University studying comparative literature and economics while maintaining full-time employment. Idarraga saw his right to vote as a significant and crucial aspect to rebuilding his life and to contributing to his community.
publications
June 26, 2017

Trends in U.S. Corrections

The Sentencing Project's key fact sheet provides a compilation of major developments in the criminal justice system over the past several decades.
news
Jeff Sessions wants a new war on drugs. It won’t work.
June 23, 2017

Jeff Sessions wants a new war on drugs. It won’t work.

In The Washington Post, David Cole of the ACLU and Marc Mauer explain why Sessions' revival of the drug war will devastate families without reducing crime or solving the drug crisis.  
Featured Story
Featured Story

Kemba Smith

At 24 years old, Kemba Smith was sentenced to 24.5 years in prison for conspiracy to participate in her boyfriend's drug activities, a non-violent, first-time offense. For years, her parents galvanized a tireless movement seeking clemency for their daughter.
news
Sessions is taking us back to the future
June 19, 2017

Sessions is taking us back to the future

Sessions' new "tough on crime" directive will inevitably contribute to a rise in the federal prison population and will be counterproductive to promoting public safety, write Marc Mauer and Kara Gotsch in an op-ed for the San Francisco Daily Journal.
news
Disenfranchisement News: In Alabama, thousands more to regain voting rights
June 06, 2017

Disenfranchisement News: In Alabama, thousands more to regain voting rights

Alabama defines which convictions will result in loss of voting rights, Nebraska fails to remove two-year waiting period on voting, and more in the latest Disenfranchisement News.
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Featured Story

Kimberly Haven

Kimberly Haven’s journey as an advocate began when she sought to regain her own voting rights after release from a Maryland prison in 2001. She soon became passionate about the unfairness of disenfranchising citizens after they have completed their sentence and returned to the community.
news
Solitary confinement is widespread and ineffective
June 01, 2017

Solitary confinement is widespread and ineffective

Josh Rovner
Commentary by Juvenile Justice Advocacy Associate Josh Rovner for Inside Sources.
publications
May 24, 2017

U.S. Prison Population Trends 1999-2015: Modest Reductions with Significant Variation

While the majority of states have at least modestly reduced their prison populations in recent years, 16 states have achieved double-digit rates of decline and the federal system has downsized at almost twice the national rate.
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Featured Story

Willie Mays Aikens

In 2008, Willie Mays Aikens made headlines when a federal judge reduced his lengthy prison term to 14 years as a result of the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s adjustment to the crack cocaine sentencing guidelines. Aikens was released in June 2008.
publications
May 22, 2017

Testimony to U.S. Commission on Civil Rights on Eliminating Felony Disenfranchisement Laws

news
Race & Justice News: Can Ban the Box Policies Result in Racial Discrimination?
May 17, 2017

Race & Justice News: Can Ban the Box Policies Result in Racial Discrimination?

Ban the Box reforms may disadvantage job applicants of color who do not have criminal histories, Brooklyn prosecutors protect immigrants from deportation over petty crimes, and more in Race and Justice News.
Featured Story
Featured Story

Dorothy Gaines

Dorothy Gaines's life changed when Alabama state police raided her home for drugs. Police found no evidence of Gaines having possessed or sold drugs, yet federal prosecutors charged Gaines with drug conspiracy.
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