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Unlocking Justice: Dollars and Detainees—Opportunities for Sentencing Reform and Advocacy

August 15, 2012
This webinar featured advocates engaged in efforts to stop the expansion of detention, addressed issues with private prisons, and highlighted sentencing reform opportunities.

A recent report published by The Sentencing Project, Dollars and Detainees: The Growth of For-Profit Detention, details how harsher immigration enforcement and legislation led to a 59% increase in the number of detainees being held by the federal government between 2002 and 2011.

The report examines how Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) have increasingly relied on private companies to detain these individuals, as well as examining the complex network of facilities that house federal detainees, and the failings of private detention.

This webinar featured advocates engaged in efforts to stop the expansion of detention, addressed issues with private prisons, and highlighted sentencing reform opportunities.

Presenters:

  • Bob Libal, Grassroots Leadership 
  • Cody Mason, The Sentencing Project 
  • Hope Mustakim, Family member of formerly detained person 
  • Nazry Mustakim, Formerly detained person 
  • Nicole D. Porter, The Sentencing Project
  • Emily Tucker, Detention Watch Network

The webinar slides are available for download below.

 
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