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The Sentencing Project’s 2019 Annual Newsletter

November 25, 2019
This past year we have seen a growing movement to include people convicted of serious offenses in criminal justice reform efforts.

This past year we have seen a growing movement to include people convicted of serious offenses in criminal justice reform efforts. While we acknowledge that we have a long way to go to end mass incarceration, we are proud to be a leading voice in pushing the national conversation towards a fair and effective justice system for all.

Our 2019 annual newsletter provides an overview of our efforts this year, which have included:

  • Documenting the growing number of states that have introduced legislation to scale back long-term sentences and building coalitions around ending life imprisonment
  • Reporting successful reforms in 19 states that have produced more effective, fiscally sound, and humane policies for people with violent convictions
  • Advocating on behalf of successful “Raise the Age” efforts in the juvenile justice system
  • Fighting for the fair and expedient implementation of the First Step Act passed by Congress
  • Working with state organizers to expand voting rights to people with felony convictions

Click here to read our 2019 annual newsletter.

 
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