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The Sentencing Project’s 2017 Annual Newsletter

November 08, 2017
Despite this changing political environment we have made strides in advancing justice and helping to shape a reform agenda for both policymakers and the advocacy community in 2017.

This year, we have faced many challenges to meaningful criminal justice reform. Attorney General Sessions has reversed many of the reforms initiated by his predecessors, while calling for “tough” policies on crime and immigration. We and our allies have documented the counterproductive nature of such policies, and opposition is growing nationally.

Despite this changing political environment we have made strides in advancing justice and helping to shape a reform agenda for both policymakers and the advocacy community. Our 2017 annual newsletter provides an overview of our efforts this year, which have included:

  • Producing a policy report that refutes the message that immigrants are responsible for rising crime
  • Working with our allies in New Jersey to advance racial impact statement legislation
  • Calling national attention to the escalation in sentences of life imprisonment
  • Providing data analysis in support of South Carolina’s “raise the age” legislation
  • Gaining more than 500 media mentions and publishing op-ed commentary in the Washington Post, U.S. News and World Report, Newsday, and many other outlets

Click here to read our 2017 annual newsletter.

 
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