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Race to Incarcerate

January 01, 2006
In this revised edition of his seminal book on race, class, and the criminal justice system, Marc Mauer, Executive Director of The Sentencing Project, offers the most up-to-date look available at three decades of prison expansion in America.

Described by Jonathan Kozol as “a tremendously disturbing and important book,” Race to Incarcerate provides an updated account of the explosion in America’s prison population.

race_to_incarcerate_coverIn this revised edition of his seminal book on race, class, and the criminal justice system, Marc Mauer, Executive Director of The Sentencing Project, offers the most up-to-date look available at three decades of prison expansion in America.

Including newly written material on recent developments under the Bush Administration and updated statistics, graphs, and charts throughout, the book tells the tragic story of runaway growth in the number of prisons and jails and the overreliance on imprisonment to stem problems of economic and social development. Called “sober and nuanced” by Publishers WeeklyRace to Incarcerate documents the enormous financial and human toll of the “get tough” movement, and argues for more humane—and productive—alternatives.

The book is published by The New Press and available from its catalog and national booksellers.

 
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