Skip to main content
Publications

Fighting to End Juvenile Life without Parole: The 25th Anniversary of the U.N. Convention of the Rights of the Child

November 20, 2014
On the 25th anniversary of the passage of the UN's Convention on the Rights of the Child, national and local experts held a webinar to discuss how a children’s rights framework can be used to fight against harsh penalties for juveniles.

On November 20, 1989, the United Nations passed the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The United States, along with Somalia and South Sudan, remains one of the few nations that have failed to ratify the CRC, leaving the US as the only nation violating the CRC’s ban on juvenile life without parole and other harsh sentencing practices, such as trying children in adult courts.

Today, the United States incarcerates more children than any other nation. On the 25th Anniversary of the passage of the treaty, join national and local experts on how a children’s rights framework can be used to fight against harsh penalties for juveniles.

This webinar emphasizes legislative and judicial responses to the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2012 ruling, Miller v. Alabama, which eliminated the use of mandatory life without parole sentences for juveniles.

Presenters:

Xavier McElrath-Bey and James Dold, Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth
Josh Rovner, The Sentencing Project
Betsy Clarke, Juvenile Justice Initiative

The webinar slides are available here, and a video recording can be viewed here.

This webinar was sponsored by The Sentencing Project, Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth and the National Juvenile Justice Network.

 
Related Posts
publications
June 14, 2016

The Color of Justice 2016 Report

African Americans are incarcerated in state prisons across the country at more than five times the rate of whites, and at least ten times the rate in five states. This report documents the rates of incarceration for whites, African Americans, and Hispanics in each state, identifies three contributors to racial and ethnic disparities in imprisonment, and provides recommendations for reform.
publications
October 07, 2021

Sign-on Letter: Pass the Redefinition of Child Amendment Act of 2021

Justice organizations urge the Mayor and the Council of the District of Columbia to pass Bill 4-0338, the Redefinition of Child Amendment Act of 2021 as a necessary, common sense approach to juvenile justice reform that will create better outcomes for youth and communities, will treat children as children, and will make significant steps forward in advancing racial equity.