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Amicus Brief in Alleyne v. United States, Supreme Court Case Involving Mandatory Minimum Sentences for Drug Offenses

January 15, 2013
Because mandatory minimum sentences are a significant driver of racial disparities in sentencing, requiring a higher burden of proof in order to impose such sentences would reduce unwarranted racial disparities in the criminal justice system.

The Sentencing Project filed a friend-of-the-court brief in support of the proposition that drug quantity must be proved to a jury beyond a reasonable doubt in order to impose a mandatory minimum sentence.

Because mandatory minimums are a significant driver of racial disparities, requiring a higher burden of proof in order to impose such sentences would reduce unwarranted racial disparities in sentencing.

To read this amicus brief, download the PDF below.

 
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