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Will Trump Crush the Modest Progress in Fighting Mass Incarceration?

February 07, 2017
Now what? Alternet interview with The Sentencing Project's Marc Mauer.

For the first time in decades, we have seen small declines in the number of people behind bars in the United States. Much of the progress on criminal justice reform has come under the Obama administration, but now, there’s a new sheriff in town, and he doesn’t seem as reform-friendly as Obama. Phillip Smith of Alternet interviewed Marc Mauer to try and find some answers on what’s going to happen with sentencing reform and criminal justice reform under President Trump.

PS: That is the big question. So, what about Trump? What do you foresee?

MM: Well, during the campaign, Trump called himself the law-and-order candidate, and he’s been a vocal proponent of the death penalty and other tough measures, so that isn’t encouraging. And if Sessions becomes attorney general, he would be involved, too, and that doesn’t bode well for sentencing reform. Whether he makes this a priority issue or lets his GOP colleagues on Capitol Hill take the lead will tell us a lot about the prospects…

Click here to read the full interview.

 
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