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Virginia Court Overturns Order That Restored Voting Rights To Felons

July 22, 2016
In a 4-3 ruling, the Virginia Supreme Court decided that Gov. Terry McAuliffe doesn't have the authority for a blanket restoration of voting rights to state residents with felony convictions.

In a 4-3 ruling, the Virginia Supreme Court decided that Gov. Terry McAuliffe doesn’t have the authority for a blanket restoration of voting rights to state residents with felony convictions.

In April, the governor had issued a sweeping executive order that affected 206,000 Virginians with felony convictions.

In response to the court’s ruling, Gov. McAuliffe vowed to restore voting rights one by one.

“I will expeditiously sign nearly 13,000 individual orders to restore the fundamental rights of the citizens who have had their rights restored and registered to vote,” he said. “And I will continue to sign orders until I have completed restoration for all 200,000 Virginians.”

Read the full article on NPR.

 
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