Skip to main content
News

In 2016 Campaign, Both Parties Want Reform in Justice System

November 26, 2015
The 2016 presidential race has accelerated an evolution from the "tough on crime" rhetoric that used to dominate political debates on criminal justice policy, reports the Associated Press.

The 2016 presidential race has accelerated an evolution from the “tough on crime” rhetoric that used to dominate political debates on criminal justice policy, reports the Associated Press.

Candidates from both parties have taken positions in support of scaling back punitive drug policies, and “the push to rethink sentences for drug offenders is coinciding with the Black Lives Matter movement and its debate about police treatment of minorities, a heroin crisis that’s brought renewed attention to addiction and a homicide spike in some big cities.”

It’s all a big change from a generation or two ago.

“The threat of someone waging a ‘tough on crime’ campaign as their calling card is, I think, very much diminished from what we might have seen 20 years ago,” said Marc Mauer, executive director of the Sentencing Project, which advocates sentencing policy changes.

The “reform movement” has strong enough support, Mauer said, that it would be “difficult for a candidate to try to make hay out of it.”

Read the full article in the Associated Press.

 
Related Posts
publications
June 14, 2016

The Color of Justice 2016 Report

African Americans are incarcerated in state prisons across the country at more than five times the rate of whites, and at least ten times the rate in five states. This report documents the rates of incarceration for whites, African Americans, and Hispanics in each state, identifies three contributors to racial and ethnic disparities in imprisonment, and provides recommendations for reform.
publications
October 07, 2021

Sign-on Letter: Pass the Redefinition of Child Amendment Act of 2021

Justice organizations urge the Mayor and the Council of the District of Columbia to pass Bill 4-0338, the Redefinition of Child Amendment Act of 2021 as a necessary, common sense approach to juvenile justice reform that will create better outcomes for youth and communities, will treat children as children, and will make significant steps forward in advancing racial equity.