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How the Felony Drug Ban Keeps Thousands of Americans Hungry

March 21, 2016
It's past time we gave formerly incarcerated people a real chance to re-enter society.

Twenty years ago, Congress adopted the felony drug ban, which imposes a lifetime restriction on welfare and food stamp benefits for anyone convicted of a drug felony. In a commentary published on TalkPoverty, The Sentencing Project’s Federal Advocacy Counsel Jeremy Haile explains why post-incarceration punishments are ineffective and in fact may be counterproductive to public safety.

A study by The Sentencing Project found that in the 12 states that impose the lifetime ban, an estimated 180,000 women are impacted. If we include the other 24 states that impose a partial ban, the number of people affected is significantly higher. And because drug law enforcement is conducted with racial biases, people of color are disproportionately denied assistance.

Read the full commentary on TalkPoverty.

 
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