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Who’s Being Released Early and Where They’ll Go

October 25, 2015
The Sentencing Project's Executive Director Marc Mauer explains to the Associated Press that the early release of individuals convicted for drug offenses is expected to have a very minimal effect on public safety.

At the end of the month, the federal prison system is set to release 6,000 individuals convicted for drug offenses — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — as part of a national effort to reduce the impact of overly harsh sentencing laws. The Sentencing Project’s Executive Director Marc Mauer explains to the Associated Press that the early release of individuals convicted for drug offenses is expected to have a very minimal effect on public safety.

“It’s not going to release a crime wave, but some number of them are going to recidivate, because that’s true of everyone [leaving prison],” said Mauer.

“The reason we have mass incarceration is not because we don’t have enough research documenting the problem with it, but, politically, policymakers have been fearful of being soft on crime for too many years,” he said. “Now that there’s a greater comfort level, we can discuss what would work better.”

Read on at the Associated Press.

 
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