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Corrections Reform Isn’t Just About Cutting Prison Populations

January 12, 2016
In a commentary in The Crime Report, The Sentencing Project's Executive Director Marc Mauer makes the case for including reducing high rates of community supervision as a key priority for criminal justice reform.

While in recent years there has been an increasing focus on challenging mass incarceration, less attention has been devoted to examining corrections populations overall. In a commentary in The Crime Report, The Sentencing Project’s Executive Director Marc Mauer makes the case for including reducing high rates of community supervision as a key priority for criminal justice reform.

The overall decline in corrections populations is encouraging but, as with the prison population figures, it’s clear that the national trends remain quite modest. A  2013 analysis of The Sentencing Project found that at the previous year’s rate of decarceration, which remains the greatest thus far, it would take 88 years to reduce the prison population down to where it was in 1980.

Similar estimates could be developed for probation and parole today.

Read the full commentary in The Crime Report.

 
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