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C-SPAN highlights The Sentencing Project’s 6 Million Lost Voters Report

October 06, 2016
Marc Mauer discusses The Sentencing Project's felony disenfranchisement report, and answers questions from people for and against restoring rights to people with felony convictions.

Marc Mauer, Executive Director of the Sentencing Project, was recently featured on CSPAN discussing The Sentencing Project’s publication, 6 Million Lost Voters: State-Level Estimates of Felony Disenfranchisement, 2016The report found that 6.1 million people — 1 of every 40 adults — are disenfranchised because of state laws that bar voting by Americans with a felony conviction, and in some states even if they have completed all requirements of their sentence. Over three-quarters of this population (4.7 million people) are not incarcerated, but are living in their local communities – some on probation or parole, while others have completed their legal obligations. The program discussed the various state laws and recent reforms. Mauer responded to telephone calls and electronic communications from people for and against restoring rights to people with felony convictions, including a telephone line reserved for people with felony convictions.

You can watch the full segment below and here.

 
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