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Incarceration Publications
July 2014 Fewer Prisoners, Less Crime: A Tale of Three States

In this report, The Sentencing Project that examines the potential for substantial prison population reductions. Fewer Prisoners, Less Crime: A Tale of Three States profiles the experiences of three states – New York, New Jersey, and California – that have reduced their prison populations by about 25% while seeing their crime rates generally decline at a faster pace than the national average.

Author: Marc Mauer, Nazgol Ghandnoosh
Issue Area(s): Sentencing Policy, Incarceration, Racial Disparity, Drug Policy, Women

July 2014 Shadow Report of The Sentencing Project to the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

Along with 11 allied civil rights and justice reform organizations, The Sentencing Project submitted a shadow report regarding racial disparities in the justice system to the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD). Our report documents continuing disparities in incarceration, the imposition of juvenile life without parole, the death penalty, and felony disenfranchisement. The review of United States’ compliance with the CERD convention will take place in August.

Issue Area(s): Sentencing Policy, Incarceration, Racial Disparity, Felony Disenfranchisement, Juvenile Justice

July 2014 Comment on 2014 Drug Guidelines Amendment Retroactivity

The Sentencing Project is urging the U.S. Sentencing Commission to apply reduced penalties for federal drug offenses retroactively. The Sentencing Project argued in comments submitted to the Commission that there is no sound basis on which to have sentence dates determine sentence lengths, and that partial retroactivity would exacerbate racial disparities in federal sentencing.

Author: The Sentencing Project
Issue Area(s): Sentencing Policy, Incarceration, Drug Policy

June 2014 Letter in Support of California Senate Bill 1010

The Sentencing Project submitted a letter to California's Assembly Public Safety Committee in support of Senate Bill 1010. The proposed legislation has been approved by the state's Senate and would equalize penalties for crack and powder cocaine offenses. Sentences for intent-to-sell crack convictions range from three to five years in current state law, compared to two to four years for powder. Crack convictions in low-income communities and communities of color are more common because crack is cheaper than powder. SB 1010 would eliminate the difference in sentencing, probation and asset forfeiture rules for low level powder and crack cocaine offenses.

Issue Area(s): Drug Policy, Racial Disparity, Incarceration, Sentencing Policy