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COLLATERAL CONSEQUENCES



Increasingly, laws and policies are being enacted to restrict persons with a felony conviction (particularly convictions for drug offenses) from employment, receipt of welfare benefits, access to public housing, and eligibility for student loans for higher education. Such collateral penalties place substantial barriers to an individual's social and economic advancement.

 

Collateral Consequences News
April 17, 2015
State Advocacy Update: Connecticut Governor calls for "Second Chance Society"

Connecticut: Governor Leads Effort for "Second Chance Society"

Kentucky: Addressing Sentence Lengths for Persons with Prior Felony Convictions

Massachusetts: Advocates Support Felony Reclassification and Reinvesting Savings

Other News: Alabama, Maryland, Missouri, and more...


April 15, 2015 (Salon)
America’s criminal justice disgrace: How Apple’s ban of former felons reveals the long road to real reform

The Sentencing Project's Director of Advocacy Nicole Porter recently spoke with Salon about employment for people with criminal records, criminal justice issues as civil rights issues, and what is necessary to take to tackle mass incarceration in the United States.


April 10, 2015
Disenfranchisement News: MD legislature approves voting rights for people on probation & parole

Maryland: Legislature approves voting rights bill for people on probation and parole

Minnesota: Voting rights bill appears stalled

National: U.S. lawmakers introduce bill to restore voting rights after prison

International: Election newspaper distributed to Australian prisons and locked hospitals


March 16, 2015
Race and Justice News: Girls in the School-to-Prison Pipeline

School-to-Prison Pipeline: Compendium of Suspension Trends for Grades K-12

Girls in the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Reforms: School Discipline Reforms in Texas, Minneapolis, New York, and California

Iowa's Racial Impact Legislation Having Modest Impact

Juvenile Justice: Unwarranted Racial Disparities and Increasing Punitiveness in Juvenile Justice

Drug Law Enforcement: Racial Differences in Drug Arrest Rates Cannot Be Explained by Drug Offending or Community Contexts


March 10, 2015 (The Sentencing Project)
Senators Booker and Paul Reintroduce REDEEM Act to Protect and Restore Lives

On Monday, Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Rand Paul (R-KY) reintroduced the REDEEM Act (S. 675), legislation that would help to protect and restore the lives of individuals who have had contact with the criminal or juvenile justice system, while reducing recidivism.  

The bipartisan REDEEM Act would repeal the felony drug ban for some people convicted of non-violent drug offenses. It would allow the sealing of criminal records and improve the accuracy of FBI background checks. And it would make necessary improvements to the treatment of young people who encounter the juvenile justice system.