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COLLATERAL CONSEQUENCES



Increasingly, laws and policies are being enacted to restrict persons with a felony conviction (particularly convictions for drug offenses) from employment, receipt of welfare benefits, access to public housing, and eligibility for student loans for higher education. Such collateral penalties place substantial barriers to an individual's social and economic advancement.

 

Collateral Consequences News
November 20, 2014 (The Sentencing Project)
New Resource for Information and Commentary on Collateral Consequences

The Collateral Consequences Resource Center has launched a new website to raise awareness and promote discussion on the laws and policies that create barriers to reentry. The site will provide news and commentary about developments in courts and legislatures, practice and advocacy resources, and advice about how to restore rights and status in various jurisdictions. The Center aims to reach a broad audience of lawyers and other criminal justice practitioners, scholars and researchers, policymakers and legislators, as well as those most directly affected by the consequences of conviction.  


November 19, 2014
State Advocacy Update: 2014 Midterm Analysis and More

2014 Midterm Analysis

Helpful Campaign Strategies

Reducing Prison Population

Other News


November 17, 2014 (The Sentencing Project)
New Publication: Incorporating Racial Equity into Criminal Justice Reform

There are few areas of American society where racial disparities are as profound and as troubling as in the criminal justice system. Our newest report, Incorporating Racial Equity into Criminal Justice Reform, provides an overview of racial disparities in the criminal justice system and a framework for developing and implementing remedies for these disparities.


November 7, 2014 (The Sentencing Project)
Hot Off the Presses: The Sentencing Project's 2014 Newsletter

Our 2014 Newsletter is out! Read it to find out what we’ve been up to in the last year, including:

  • How three states – New York, New Jersey, and California – reduced their prison populations in the range of 25% and saw their crime rates generally decline even faster than the national average
  • Updates on federal sentencing reform, including the United States Sentencing Commission’s decision to apply their reduced sentencing guidelines retroactively to 46,000 people currently serving time for drug offenses
  • How state advocates from across the country gained insight and support in strategizing for racial impact statements from The Sentencing Project during our State Advocacy Convening

…and much more!


November 5, 2014 (The Liman Report, Yale Law School)
Leveraging the Moment: Resources for High Incarceration Communities

The coalition in support of criminal justice reform is expanding. I recently had the opportunity to present at the League of Women Voters’ national convention. In a meeting room at a Washington area hotel, older women from suburban communities in Missouri and Arizona were very concerned about the nation’s “war on drugs” and the failures of our prison system.

That afternoon underscored just how far the conversation has progressed in the past decade. Leaders from different ideological perspectives are calling for changes to the nation’s criminal justice system. Newt Gingrich, the former Republican Speaker of the House, recently announced an effort to lower the nation’s incarceration rate by fifty percent by 2050. And earlier this year, Attorney General Eric Holder announced a significant expansion of the federal clemency process in order to reduce excessive prison terms for low-level drug offenders.


Author: Nicole D. Porter