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INCARCERATION


 
The United States is the world's leader in incarceration with 2.2 million people currently in the nation's prisons or jails -- a 500% increase over the past thirty years. These trends have resulted in prison overcrowding and state governments being overwhelmed by the burden of funding a rapidly expanding penal system, despite increasing evidence that large-scale incarceration is not the most effective means of achieving public safety.

U.S. State and Federal Prison Population, 1925-2012

Incarceration News
April 15, 2014 (MagicValley.com)
Prison Reform and Bridging the Partisan Gap

Jon Alexander writes that the United States “is really good at a few things. First and foremost might just be our ability to lock people up. And with the states annually spending north of $50 billion throwing people behind bars, it’s the American prison epidemic that might bridge the liberal-conservative gap that’s leaving most of American policymaking in the lurch.

“The United states constitutes just 5 percent of the planet’s human population. But American jails and prisons hold 25 percent of all the inmates on Earth, says the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. That’s right, one-quarter of all the world’s prisoners are locked up in the U.S. About one in every 33 American adults is in jail or prison, a number that’s more than doubled since 1990.

“The reasons are packed full of racial and economic baggage. Recent decades saw policy that sent offenders with a little crack-cocaine in his pocket to prison for years. Someone with the more expensive cocaine might get a slap on the wrist. Crack spent decades as the scorn of poor, often black neighborhoods. Middle-class and wealthy whites do coke. Drug policy is especially relevant here. More people are behind bars because of drugs than murder, rape or any other violent offense.

“In Idaho, the incarceration rate of blacks in 2007 was four-times higher than whites, according to a report from The Sentencing Project. The incarceration rate for Hispanics is double that of whites in Idaho. And that’s in one of the statistically safest states in the nation.


April 14, 2014 (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
Felons' rights all over the map

“Felon voting” sounds ominous but in Minnesota, it poses a potent political and civil rights question: When should felons who are trying to rebuild their lives regain their right to vote?

People convicted of a felony lose that right as part of their punishment. The Minnesota Constitution denies the right to “a person convicted of treason or felony, unless restored to civil rights.” In Minnesota, such rights cannot be restored until the person has first completed all the terms of the sentence, including incarceration, probation and parole and supervised release.

The issue, which a conservative group once cited on a freeway billboard as the reason Minnesota was “#1 in voter fraud” (an unproven claim), was back at the Legislature this year. It was predictably volatile. The two sides could not agree on a compromise, so current law remains unchanged.

An advocates’ group known as Restore the Vote-Minnesota sought to restore voting rights when a felon leaves prison or jail, even if he or she is still under supervision. They argued that this will eliminate inadvertent illegal votes by released felons who don’t understand the law, help with felons’ transition to life in their communities and reverse a growing disenfranchisement of black males, who are overrepresented in the criminal justice system.

Defenders of the current system, including Minnesota Majority, the organization whose political committee put up the “#1” billboard two years ago, says felons are “outlaws” who should not have a hand in creating laws “that the law-abiding live under.” Such voters would, they contend, have an interest in electing lenient judges and prosecutors. 


April 11, 2014 (Connectionnewspapers.com)
Considering the Effects of Mass Incarceration

There is a racial disparity in the number of people incarcerated in the United States. Nearly one in ten black men in their thirties is in jail. This number has increased due to the war on drugs, which has also seen a racial disparity in the numbers of those convicted.

“Black men have the highest likelihood of incarceration-one in three are likely to serve a prison sentence at some point in their lives,” said Nazgol Ghandnoosh, a research analyst for The Sentencing Project. “For drug convictions, the racial disparities are even higher, and this is even though there is research showing that people of different ethnic backgrounds use drugs at the same rate.” Ghandnoosh joined other leaders in the community at a discussion on this topic at “The Effects of Mass Incarceration: A Public Forum on Criminal Justice Sentencing Reform” hosted by Accotink Unitarian Universalist Church in Burke.

Penalties for crack, the crystallized form of the cocaine, which comes in powder form, are harsh compared to those for cocaine. Although the drugs are pharmaceutically the same, a person possessing 28 grams of crack faces a mandatory five year sentence, while 500 grams of cocaine are required for this mandatory sentence. 


April 11, 2014 (Colorlines.com)
For Missouri Moms, A Past Drug Conviction Means No Food Aid, Ever

Missouri is one of 10 states that still ban people with felony drug convictions from ever receiving food stamps. Overall, according to a report by The Sentencing Project, an estimated 180,000 women and their children, primarily families of color, are disproportionately affected by this little-known holdover from Clinton-era welfare reform. Now for the first time Missouri’s legislature is looking at loosening if not lifting the lifetime ban. Even with bipartisan support however, it’s unclear whether the bill will make it through.

The majority of the other states still riding hard for this War on Drugs-era punishment are located in the South.

 


April 8, 2014 (MediaMatters)
Medicaid Provision Attacked that Reduces Recidivism for Incarcerated People

The April 7 edition of Fox News' America's Newsroom debated whether it is "smart money" to cover formerly incarcerated people through Medicaid. Fox contributor Tony Sayegh called enrolling ex-offenders in Medicaid "a loophole of Obamacare" that makes "absolutely no sense."

Yet numerous sources note that health care benefits for incarcerated people not only help them to return to society mentally and physically healthier but also reduce recividism.

According to a report by The Sentencing Project, “the expansion of Medicaid under the ACA could lead to treatment services for inmates that could reduce correctional costs and decrease incarceration.