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Racial Disparity News
September 15, 2014 (The Sentencing Project)
Disenfranchisement News

Florida: Voting Rights in Jail 

Wyoming: Opportunity for Reform 

Kentucky: New voting rights bill in consideration for 2015 

International: ECHR rules ban on prisoner voting violates human rights

Voting from behind bars in Ireland 


September 8, 2014 (The New York Times)
Crime, Bias and Statistics

Discussions of the relationship between blacks and the criminal justice system in this country too often grind to a halt as people slink down into their silos and arm themselves with their best rhetorical weapons — racial bias on one side and statistics in which minorities, particularly blacks, are overrepresented as criminals on the other.


September 3, 2014 (The Sentencing Project)
New Publication: Race and Punishment: Racial Perceptions of Crime and Support for Punitive Policies

This report examines how racial perceptions of crime are a key cause of the severity of punishment in the United States. Race and Punishment: Racial Perceptions of Crime and Support for Punitive Policies, authored by Nazgol Ghandnoosh, Ph.D., research analyst at The Sentencing Project, synthesizes two decades of research revealing that white Americans’ strong associations of crime with blacks and Latinos are related to their support for punitive policies that disproportionately impact people of color.

Coming on the heels of the tragic events in Ferguson, Missouri, the report demonstrates that the consequences of white Americans’ strong associations of crime with blacks and Latinos extend far beyond policing.


August 7, 2014 (The Sentencing Project)
Disenfranchisement News

National: Bipartisan Efforts for National Felony Disenfranchisement Reform

Wyoming: State Bill Could Restore Voting Rights to Thousands

Kentucky: Louisville Metro Council Unanimously Approves Resolution in Support of Automatic Rights Restoration


August 2, 2014 (Al Jazeera America)
Holder: Data-driven prison sentencing ‘unfair’ to minorities

Attorney General Eric Holder on Friday expressed concern about the fairness of judges who rely on big data to sentence criminal defendants, saying the use of such “risk assessments” in several states could exacerbate racial disparities among the prison population.

Holder, who made the comments during a Philadelphia speech to criminal defense lawyers, said the use of such data results in unfair treatment of minorities.

“Basing a sentence on something other than the conduct of the person involved and the person’s record, you’re looking, for instance, at factors like the person’s education level, what neighborhood the person comes from,” Holder said in an interview with PBS on Thursday. “They’re using this as a predictor of how likely this person as an individual is going to be a recidivist. I’m not at all certain that I’m comfortable with that … I think the result is fundamental unfairness.”

Research has shown that racial minorities who don’t have regular jobs or steady families are likely to be charged with more severe crimes, leading to longer prison sentences, according to Nazgol Ghandnoosh, a research analyst for The Sentencing Project, an organization dedicated to sentencing reform in U.S. prisons.