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Young Black Americans and the Criminal Justice System: Five Years Later

October 01, 1995
Marc Mauer and Tracy Huling
In this follow-up study, we find that many of the contributing factors to high rates of criminal justice contact for young black Americans five years ago endure or have worsened in the intervening years.

In 1990, The Sentencing Project released a report that documented that almost one in four (23%) African American males in the age group 20-29 was under some form of criminal justice supervision – in prison or jail, on probation or parole.

That report received extensive national attention and helped to generate much dialogue and activity on the part of policymakers, community organizations, and criminal justice professionals.

Despite these efforts, many of the factors contributing to the high rates of criminal justice control for African American males remain unchanged or have worsened during the succeeding five years. Public policies ostensibly designed to control crime and drug abuse have in many respects contributed to the growing racial disparity in the criminal justice system while having little impact on the problems they were aimed to address.

To read the report, download the PDF below.

 
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