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The Sentencing Project Releases its 2017 Annual Report

March 29, 2018
Learn more about how our research and analysis in 2017 played a major role in shaping the policy debate around criminal justice reform.

The Sentencing Project’s 2017 Annual Report documents our response to challenges by the Trump Administration to turn back the clock on justice reform, and our contributions to the continued momentum for fair and effective criminal justice policies at the federal, state and local level.

For more than thirty years, The Sentencing Project has played a major role in producing research and analysis designed to shape the policy debate on these issues. Reforms that our work promoted in 2017 and that received wide coverage include:

  • annual report coverInvestigating effective and humane ways of treating the opioid crisis without relying on failed drug war policies;
  • Publishing reports highlighting the urgent need to address our growing lifer population in order to end mass incarceration
  • Documenting that U.S. immigrants—regardless of legal status—commit crimes at lower rates than native born citizens and that policies further restricting immigration are ineffective crime-control strategies.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Click to here read the full report.

 

 
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