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Addressing the Collateral Consequences of Convictions for Young Offenders

August 17, 2011
This article, published by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, explores areas in need of attention and reform so that young people who have been adjudicated delinquent or convicted of a crime are not punished subsequently by other systems they encounter.

People exiting the custody of the criminal justice system encounter substantial challenges in gaining employment, finding housing, and accessing medical and mental health care.

A popular area of focus among advocates, practitioners, law enforcement, and right-minded policymakers over the past decade has been the strengthening of re-entry support so that the odds of recidivism and return to the system are minimized. Some of this advocacy centers on easing the restrictions that frequently accompany a conviction such as housing bans, placement on public registries, and employment barriers. Less attention has been paid to the consequences that accompany a juvenile conviction, but young people also face system-imposed obstacles to success based on a delinquent or criminal record.

This article, published by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, explores areas in need of attention and reform so that young people who have been adjudicated delinquent or convicted of a crime are not punished subsequently by other systems they encounter. The informed defense attorney is in an ideal position to ensure that clients are not subjected to unwarranted collateral consequences.

To read the article, download the PDF below.

 
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