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The President’s Role in Advancing Criminal Justice Reform

January 05, 2017
President Obama draws on The Sentencing Project's research to highlight the urgent need to end mass incarceration.

In his final weeks in office, President Obama published a major commentary in the Harvard Law Review on the president’s role in advancing criminal justice reform. President Obama relied on The Sentencing Project’s research throughout the journal article to highlight the urgent need to end mass incarceration, to underscore the ways the juvenile justice system falls short and disproportionately targets children of color, and to support restoration of voting rights to people disenfranchised due to a felony conviction.

We simply cannot afford to spend $80 billion annually on incarceration, to write off the seventy million Americans — that’s almost one in three adults — with some form of criminal record, to release 600,000 inmates each year without a better program to reintegrate them into society, or to ignore the humanity of 2.2 million men and women currently in U.S. jails and prisons…

Read President Obama’s full commentary here.

 
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